SlowShutter… Why II

One of the things I didn’t realize about SlowShutter is it allows you to set the shutter speed. (hey, I didn’t say I paid attention..)
We were at the opening of the new East Gallery at the Grounds For Sculpture and I thought I’d take a few pictures of the new wing. The first image was using ProCamera, my normal “quickie” camera.

Inside the new East Gallery at the Grounds for Sculpture

Inside the new East Gallery at the Grounds for Sculpture

This is an ok image, a little static though, so I thought this would be a good time to try out SlowShutter and see if I could introduce a little motion in it.
Since I didn’t have a tripod with me, I had to try to wedge the iPhone inside the buck frame of an outside door to properly steady it.
The first image is shutter speed set to 0.5 seconds

Inside the new East Gallery at the Grounds for Sculpture

Inside the new East Gallery at the Grounds for Sculpture with a .5 sec exposure with SlowShutter


There is a little movment on the ground but still rather static.
The next one is 2 sec.
Inside the new East Gallery at the Grounds for Sculpture

Inside the new East Gallery at the Grounds for Sculpture with a 2 sec exposure with SlowShutter


You can now see the effect I’m after. The rush of the crowd inside the still container. This is pretty much the look I wanted but the room isn’t completely sharp (remember, no tripod..)
and now 4 sec.
Inside the new East Gallery at the Grounds for Sculpture.

Inside the new East Gallery at the Grounds for Sculpture with a 4 sec exposure with SlowShutter


and finally 8 sec.
Inside the new East Gallery at the Grounds for Sculpture

Inside the new East Gallery at the Grounds for Sculpture with a 8 sec exposure with SlowShutter

You can see that it’s almost impossible to steady a camera for that period unless it’s firmly pressed into a flat, supporting surface. I also did a 16 second exposure but it’s not even worth seeing.
Another think you may notice is the variability in the rate people move. Crowds have a tendency to surge and stop. Once you find the correct exposure, shoot a bunch and pick the best one.

Please remember that what I’ve just showed also applies to Big Boy cameras too…

Blending several of the images together can also make for a wild composition.

Speaking of Blending… I think my next note will be on using BigLens and Blender to direct visual focus inside an image.

About whyphotograph

Photographer, computerist, slayer of Dragons Head of Photography for AWSchmitt Ltd. producing Creative, Illustrative Photography for your needs. ( www.awschmitt.com ) Formally Head of Photography, Peters Valley Center For Crafts, Layton, NJ (www.petersvalley.org)
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